Archive for the ‘Day School’ Category

Day School: Exploring Colonial Melodrama

Isaach De Bankolé as Protée with Cécile Ducasse as the young France in Chocolat

Mechanics Institute Library, Bradford

Saturday 14 March, 10.30am – 4.30pm

Tutor: Roy Stafford

The legacy of empire and colonisation lies uneasily across contemporary Europe and provides a rich source of story ideas for filmmakers. In particular, the melodrama, with its focus on relationships, seems uniquely suited for an exploration of the themes of oppression and the clash of cultures. The colonised must choose to resist or to acquiesce or, perhaps, attempt to join the the coloniser and be ‘accepted’. These questions of identity are still being raised in the ‘post-colonial world’ after the independence of most European colonies between the 1940s and the 1970s. Colonial melodramas which thrived in the colonial period are still being produced in the post-colonial world.

The day will focus mainly, but not completely, on European films. Our full screening will be Chocolat (France-West Germany-Cameroon 1988). This début film by Claire Denis uses all the elements of the colonial melodrama but presents them largely from a child’s perspective resulting in a more distanced critique. Denis herself was brought up in Africa as the daughter of a colonial civil servant in the 1950s and several of her films address identity in colonial and post-colonial settings. 

Tea and coffee are available in the Mechanics Institute Library. There are places nearby to buy lunch but you are also welcome to bring your own.

Tickets are £18 and £12 concessions.

Book Tickets

Posted in Day School by / February 21st, 2020 / No Comments »

Day School: An Introduction to South Korean Cinema and the World of Bong Joon-ho

Parasite (South Korea, 2019)

Square Chapel Arts Centre, Halifax

Saturday 22 February, 10.30am – 4.30pm

Tutor: Roy Stafford

Our next Day School takes us to Square Chapel Arts Centre in Halifax, where we will take advantage of their screening programme to offer you an introduction to the South Korean cinema and the world of director Bong Joon-ho.

It is quite a while since we looked at South Korean cinema, which re-emerged as a vibrant industry towards the end of the 1990s with a large number of ‘blockbusters’ of different kinds in the domestic market.

Although these were recognised by festivals and fans of East Asian cinema, it wasn’t really until the major Korean directors made films in English that their films became better known in the UK. But it’s the Korean language films that are the best and you might remember The Handmaiden by Park Chan-wook in 2017. 

Parasite by Bong Joon-ho won the Palme d’Or at Cannes in 2019 and has been a massive success in both France and North America with 6 Oscar nominations. We will look back at a range of Bong films from different genres, but always with his signature focus on the concept of family and the development of a social commentary.

The usual ticket prices of £18 and £12 concessions apply for this event and includes a full screening of the film Parasite, likely to become the biggest box-office foreign language film of 2020.

Square Chapel is very close to Halifax Railway Station and not far from the Bus Station. There are several car parks not far away and the venue has a bar/café/restaurant.

Please note: You must book your tickets for this event direct from the Square Chapel website.

If you can’t book online, or have any queries about the venue, you can contact the box office on 01422 349 422.

Book Tickets

Posted in Day School by / February 3rd, 2020 / No Comments »

Day School: A Funny Thing Happened…On the Road to Film Comedy

A Pigeon Sat on a Branch Reflecting on Existence (Sweden 2014)

Mechanics Institute Library – Bradford

Saturday 11 January, 10.30am – 4.30pm

Tutor: Roy Stafford

Film comedies are hugely popular with audiences, but hardly recognised by critics and Academy voters for annual awards. It seems facile to say that it is difficult for critics to take comedies seriously and yet the best comic moments in films depend on great writers and highly-skilled performers.

Our day will cover many different comedy film forms from around the world. Our aim is to have fun even when we are trying to analyse how comedy films work. By contrasting Anglo-American films with films from other cultures, we might also be able to decide if, and how, comedy can cross cultural and language barriers.

Tea and coffee are available in the Mechanics Institute Library. There are places nearby to buy lunch but you are also welcome to bring your own.

Tickets are £18 and £12 concessions.

 

Sold Out

 

 

Posted in Day School by / December 30th, 2019 / No Comments »

Day School: The Cinema in 1969

Mechanics Institute Library – Bradford

Saturday 7 December, 10.30am – 4.30pm

Tutor: Roy Stafford

What was going to the pictures like in 1969? What was there to see? How did films engage with the world 50 years ago? Do any films from 1969 have meanings for us now? In Britain, 1969 saw the production of Kes by ‘Kenneth Loach’ and Tony Garnett. In the US John Schlesinger triumphed with Midnight Cowboy. Indian cinema was virtually unknown in the West but arthouse audiences knew about Satyajit Ray.

This Day School will explore films from around the world in 1969 including a focus on Medium Cool directed by Haskell Wexler, the innovative film that combined a traditional fictional narrative with documentary footage in order to explore Marshall McLuhan’s ideas about media. Set during the Democratic Convention in Chicago in 1968 this is a film with remarkable relevance for 2019.

Tea and coffee are available in the Mechanics Institute Library. There are places nearby to buy lunch but you are also welcome to bring your own.

Tickets are £18 and £12 concessions.

Posted in Day School by / November 28th, 2019 / No Comments »

Day School: Exploring Iranian Cinema

IT’S WINTER, (aka ZEMESTAN aka ZEMASTAN), Mitra Hajjar, 2006.©Artificial Eye

 

Mechanics Institute Library – Bradford

Saturday 14 September, 10.30am – 4.30pm

Tutor: Roy Stafford

 

Iran is a large country of strategic importance in Western Asia with a population of over 80 million. Cinema did not develop rapidly in what was then Persia until the 1950s. Production was considerably restricted after the Islamic Revolution of 1979 and during the Iran-Iraq War. Since then Iranian cinema has split between a local commercial popular cinema mostly unseen in the West and a more art-orientated or ‘social’ cinema which has had considerable success internationally. The work of four filmmakers, Abbas Kiarostami, Mohsen Makhmalbaf (and family members Samara, Hana and Marziyeh), Jafar Panahi and Asghar Farhadi has been prominent in overseas distribution, even when it has been banned at home.

 

Our event will try to look at examples of work by the four celebrated filmmakers, but also extend to include a wider range of directors and types of film. This exploration will provide useful background for our screening of a new Iranian film, Permission at Kala Sangam on September 24th.

 

Tea and coffee are available in the Mechanics Institute Library. There are places nearby to buy lunch but you are also welcome to bring your own.
 

Tickets are £18 and £12 concessions.

 

 Book Tickets

 

 

Posted in Day School by / August 15th, 2019 / No Comments »

Day School: Moving Away and Coming Home – Contemporary Polish Cinema

 

Mechanics Institute Library – Bradford

Saturday 22 June, 10.30am – 4.30pm

Tutor: Dr. Rona Murray

 

Film scholar Ewa Mazierska once asked whether, post communism, Polish films had changed.  “What is parochial and what is universal [ . . . ] what is only of local interest and what appeals to international audiences”, she asked. Our study day will focus on contemporary Polish cinema as it tells a story of moving away and coming home, of films that turn constantly from past to present, from outside to inside the country.  

Perhaps this mobile perspective is not surprising considering how Polish artists have left and returned, such as Pawel Pawlikowski, Agnieszka Holland and Jerzy Skolimowski. Despite their exile (self-imposed or otherwise), their perspective has stayed uniquely Polish, by turns poetic, surreal and blackly humorous. The day will examine how Polish filmmakers (including these auteurs) bring history and the modern world together in stories which are strongly rooted in national subjects and places, but which vibrantly capture a universal state of flux and uncertainty.

The day includes a screening of Agnieszka Holland’s Spoor (Pokot) (2017). Described as an ‘eco-thriller’ it is a beautifully-filmed, at times darkly comic, tale of hunting and activism, community and seclusion, past and present in central Europe set in Poland’s Kłodzko Valley. Co-directed with her daughter, Kasia Adamik, it is a modern and radical story from a well-established auteur.

Tea and coffee are available in the Mechanics Institute Library. There are places nearby to buy lunch but you are also welcome to bring your own.

 

Tickets are £18 and £12 concessions.

 

Book Tickets

 

 

Posted in Day School by / June 3rd, 2019 / No Comments »

Day School: A Star is Born – Barbara Stanwyck and Hollywood

 

Square Chapel – Halifax

Saturday 24 May, 10.30am – 4.30pm

Tutor: Dr Rona Murray

 

Barbara Stanwyck was a Hollywood star, one who apparently inspired the classic story of a woman’s rise to fame. In modern times, star seems an overused term for a devalued commodity, Stanwyck and her female contemporaries appear even more to represent a gold standard now consigned to the past.

 

The day will include a full screening of The Lady Eve (1941), directed by Preston Sturges and starring Barbara Stanwyck and Henry Fonda.  Sturges’ film is a Classical Hollywood screwball comedy, a description that steals a term from baseball for a ball thrown ’fast and with a twist’ to confuse the batsman. It’s a perfect vehicle for Stanwyck to take up the pitching position in the battle of the sexes and show us all of her best moves!

 

Our day spent in Stanwyck’s company will celebrate her unique talent, her importance as a female film star and, briefly, her work in television. The presentation will include the shift from a pre-code to a Hays-code Hollywood, the complex constitution of the studio system and its people and how women negotiated their position within it.  We will be able to consider how women’s work then is still important to understand today, and is being reassessed further for its enormous cultural contribution.

 

Square Chapel boasts an excellent cafe/bar on site.
 

Tickets are £18 and £12 concessions and must be purchased directly from Square Chapel box office.

 

Book Tickets

 

 

Posted in Day School by / May 10th, 2019 / No Comments »

Day School: Acting and Performance in Cinema

 

Mechanics Institute Library – Bradford

Saturday 4 May, 10.30am – 4.30pm

Tutor: Roy Stafford

 

Cinema audiences are entertained and moved/stimulated by actors and performers and some star names attract large numbers of fans. But do we really know why some performances resonate more than others? Film ‘theory’ has some things to say about acting styles and the role of the actor (and the singer, dancer and martial arts performer), but can film studies explain why someone is awarded a prize for ‘acting’ and others are ignored?

 

We’ll use a number of case studies and short narratives to explore a wide range of questions such as do forms of acting differ between cultures (and what happens if we bring them together) and how does acting change over time? Are some forms of performance ‘timeless’? What has given longevity to Laurel and Hardy, but perhaps not to some other performers who were once household names? Will Juliette Binoche always be thought to be a ‘great actress’?

 

Tea and coffee are available in the Mechanics Institute Library. There are places nearby to buy lunch but you are also welcome to bring your own.

 

Tickets are £18 and £12 concessions.

 

Book Tickets

 

 

Posted in Day School by / April 10th, 2019 / No Comments »

Day School: An Introduction to Italian Cinema + Happy as Lazzaro

 

Square Chapel – Halifax

Saturday 13 April, 11.00am – 5.00pm

Tutor: Roy Stafford

 
Our next Saturday event on April 13th takes us ‘on the road’ to Square Chapel Arts Centre in Halifax. We will take advantage of Square Chapel’s screening programme to offer you an Introduction to Italian Cinema and a full screening of Alice Rohrwacher’s new film Happy as Lazzaro.
 
Alice Rohrwacher’s previous film The Wonders was warmly received when we showed it at Kala Sangam a few years ago and this new film shared the Scriptwriting Prize at Cannes in 2018. It’s a truly magical film that is strongly recommended and our Introductory session will help you to get the most from it by exploring how it draws on the history of Italian Cinema.
 
The usual ticket prices of £18 and £12 concessions apply for this event (and include the price of the screening) but the timings are slightly different. The event runs from 11.00 am to 5pm with one hour for lunch at 1pm. The screening is at 2pm as part of the public screening programme.
 
Square Chapel is very close to Halifax Railway Station and not far from the Bus Station. There are several car parks not far away. 
 
Please note: You must book your tickets for the event direct from the Square Chapel website, using the link below. 
 
If you can’t book online or have any queries about the venue, the box office telephone no. is 01422 349 422

 

 

 

 

Posted in Day School by / March 25th, 2019 / No Comments »

Day School: Our Land and Our Stories on Screen

 

Mechanics Institute Library – Bradford

Saturday 16 March, 10.30am – 4.30pm

Tutor: Roy Stafford

 

In the long history of British (and Irish) Cinema, most production has taken place in London and the South East where the studios were built and the West End theatre was close by. But at various times and especially in the last thirty years, productions have taken place in all parts of the British Isles. This event focuses mainly on films made outside the major urban conurbations and considers how landscapes, local people and local cultures might provide the material for different kinds of films.

 

Can landscapes conjure up a feeling of belonging and a feel for the natural leading to romanticism? Documentary has been important in British cinema – can location shooting be ‘realist’ and/or ‘poetic’ and/or ‘psychological’ in its presentation of characters and stories? We’ll screen a short feature, title tbc, and look at a wide range of examples. 

 

Rona Murray will also be joining us to explore how women as directors have approached stories set in different parts of the British Isles.

 

Tea and coffee are available in the Mechanics Institute Library. There are places nearby to buy lunch but you are also welcome to bring your own.

 
 

Tickets: £18 and £12 concession.

 

Book Tickets


Posted in Day School by / February 28th, 2019 / No Comments »
Page 1 of 212»
eXTReMe Tracker